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Essential already accused of trademark infringement by Spigen

Spigen already holds a trademark for the Essential mark and so, it has asked Andy Rubin to stop using that mark for his business

Spigen has sent Essential a cease and desist letter demanding that Rubin’s company should immediately stop using the “Essential” branding, as Spigen already holds a trademark for the Essential

Essential just showed off the designs of its first smartphone and impressed the whole tech world, however, now just days after Andy Rubin’s company has already started facing problems. Even before the first shipment of the company’s new phone, Andy Rubin’s Essential has already come upon its first trademark dispute. Spigen, a smartphone-case and accessory maker, has sent Essential a cease and desist letter demanding that Rubin’s company should immediately stop using the “Essential” branding, as Spigen already holds a trademark for the Essential mark. Although it doesn’t cover any smartphone, Spigen’s Essential does cover a slew of consumer products such as a variety of battery packs and other smartphone accessories.

Spigen believes Andy Rubin’s Essential will “cause confusion” among the consumers if Rubin moves forward with the launch of its products under the Essential moniker. In the letter, Spigel’s lawyers also mentioned that the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) had previously denied the trademark application of Rubin’s Essential for this precise reason and that too twice. In refusing the mark requests from Rubin’s latest business, the USPTO pointed to the potential confusion between Essential and Spigen’s Essential sub-brand.

Credit: Wikipedia

Spigen’s legal team has asked Andy Rubin to take down the Essential mark and if they don’t get any response by June 15, Spigen is “prepared to take any and all actions to protect Spigen’s marks.”

As of yet, Essential has said that Spigen’s claims are “without merit” and the company plans to “respond accordingly.”

Well, let’s say it’s the first welcoming gift that Andy Rubin received following his entry into the world of consumer electronics business.

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